Conceptual Image Exploring Robotic Form + Skin


ONE DAY HOUSE:
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Andrew John Wit
PROJECT STATUS: Under Development

PUBLICATIONS: 
     1. eCAADe2016 Conference Proceedings. "The One Day House. Intelligent Systems for Adaptive Building."
     2. SIGRADI 2015 Conference Proceedings. "Redefining the Parametric Pedagogy."

DESCRIPTION: In architecture, “smart” and “adaptable” building systems are finding themselves more deeply ingrained within the ethos of design and fabrication.  Buildings which can sense temperature, occupation, daylighting, and other variables are allowing for the more efficient/consistent monitoring of energy as well as internal environmental conditions. Constant communications between building systems and off-site smart personal technologies are allowing for the continuous oversight and manipulating of internal conditions from abroad. 
These systems though are built upon a platform of materials, fabrication methodologies, and architectural frameworks which are, outdated, highly ridged and resistant to change. Building forms are calculated as finite elements during the design phase, accounting for a fixed set of known variables. Materials are chosen from a known pallet of predefined standards which limit levels of customization, flexibility or innovation. These standardized architectural forms can then minimally adapt to pre-calculated environmental/programmatic changes through the manipulation of secondary, complex, and rigid mechanized systems which allow for small and simplistic motions. 
In countries such as Japan where robotics and computational systems have been highly integrated into the design, fabrication and interface of the buildings, we see higher levels of quality, customization as well as user and environmental interface. Robust software's such as those used by some of the countries biggest home manufactures, allow for the quick and efficient modification and modularization of building designs from both in house and outside architects. These technologies allow for the process of conceptualizing, designing and constructing of buildings to be measured in weeks, rather then months or years. With building elements robotically fabricated in controlled conditions, labeled and moved on site with simplified instructions, complex construction is highly minimized allowing for the utilization of lower skilled workers without the concern of a lower finished quality.   
Although the construction industry in Japan is highly mechanized and data oriented, it is still highly based upon the refinement of centuries old materials and construction methodologies. Buildings although precise and efficient are not able to adapt to Tokyo's rapid urban pace.  With building life spans of only around 30 years, building for specific conditions  today do not guarantee that tomorrow they will be tomorrow. With the rapid manipulation of todays environmental and urban conditions, we must learn to create buildings and data systems which are physically flexible and which gain the ability to rapidly adapt. Learning from the implementation of the complex data and fabrication methodologies in Japan, can we not create efficient and innovative systems for rethinking modern construction? Following is the introductory research into the “One Day House”. 
This project looks at the creation of adaptable/intelligent architectural systems through the implementation of  innovative materials and methodologies for “soft” building construction.  Rather then attempting to make previous design methodologies “smarter”, this project looks at design intelligence as a process which goes beyond the creation of so called “smart” artifacts and examines the entire process of design.  The intelligence of the building must become more deeply integrated into all aspects of design conception ranging from:  How building codes are written within governments, to financial institutions and their policies for funding innovative projects, to existing and innovative materials/labor markets, through the design process, and finally down to the artifacts ability to physically adapt, and learn from its daily interactions with its inhabitants and the environment. Through the rethinking of a typical “dwelling” as a starting point, we will rethink the basic necessities of what is essential for living, and how we can the processes of design, and the finished artifact more adaptable.

Conceptual Image Exploring Robotic Form + Skin

Conceptual Image Exploring Robotic Form + Skin

Conceptual Image Exploring Robotic Form + Skin

Conceptual Image Exploring Robotic Form + Skin